Quartz, jade, amethyst: precious stones taking over cosmetics

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At the crossroads between holistic beauty and spirituality, or parasciences, the current trend is introducing fine stones and crystals into your beauty routine. Jadestone, quartz, moonstone, or even amethyst are gradually making their way into bathrooms in the form of rollers, facial treatments, and even makeup to allow as many people as possible to benefit from their energy and their virtues.

Who would’ve believed that? Gemstones and crystals are no longer just the delights of jewelers and significant jewelers. And if lithotherapy – from the Greek lithos (stone) and therapeia (cure) – has long held no secrets for those who believe in the power of stones to fight against stress, certain sleep disorders, even specific pains, it has been revealed in a new light for a few months, investing the cosmetics industry. Brands and stores, and beauty institutes follow one another to offer treatments based on extracts of stones and crystals to fight against skin aging, bring radiance to the complexion, and soothe the skin.

A new vision of beauty
The pandemic has dramatically changed consumer habits when it comes to beauty. They initially abandoned makeup in skincare, then gradually turned to more authentic beauty. Exit extended formulas, men and women today favor the qualitative over the quantitative, the natural over the superficial, prevention overcorrection. Holistic beauty, which considers treatment as a whole – food, sport, care, for example – has gradually replaced conventional beauty. The TikTok social network, mainly used by generations Z and Y, can count dozens of hashtags associated with holistic beauty, which themselves accumulate tens of millions of views.

The cosmetics industry has heard this quest for authenticity. It has resulted in particular in a remarkable comeback of herbal cosmetics and grandmother’s beauty recipes, which are multiplying at breakneck speed on social networks, as well as in the appearance and boom of cosmetics in prebiotics, nutricosmetics, and traditional practices and arts such as Kobido, but also… by the introduction of fine stones and crystals in our toilet bags.

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To a lesser extent, this craze for fine stones can also be explained by a growing interest in parasciences or esotericism, especially among the youngest, as shown by numerous studies published during confinements. Successive. Indeed, the French have had an increasingly marked taste for astrology, palmistry, spells, clairvoyance, numerology, or cartomancy since the beginning of the 2000s. Between nature and spirituality, this new impetus for the power of the stones, or the healing by the rocks, would ultimately not be surprising.

To each stone, its benefit
If cosmetic brands have placed fine stones and crystals at the heart of their DNA, such as Lightstone’s Cosmetics which offers lip oils based on amethyst or fluorite, or Roll On Jade, a specialist in semi-precious stone tools precious, other, more traditional beauty players are gradually getting started. Roll-ons, rollers, or rollers of jade, rose quartz, and amethyst, which helps fight the signs of aging, have become commonplace in the cosmetics industry, to the point that major brands like Sephora, Marionnaud, or Nocibé, offer them. This is also the case of a popular tool, the Gua Sha, which takes its name from a traditional method, whose anti-aging properties also have a host of followers worldwide, regardless of which stone – rose quartz, jade, obsidian – it has been worked.

These thousand-year-old beauty rituals, straight from Asia, and in particular from traditional Chinese medicine, are increasingly popular in the West, whether to accentuate the effects of treatment or used alone, to replace in a certain way to aesthetic medicine – always according to the philosophy of holistic beauty: “prevention is better than cure.” Some brands even introduce fine stones and crystals into skincare or makeup.

The Huda Beauty brand has just launched a whole collection of makeup around crystals with the “Rose Quartz” line, which draws its inspiration from “the therapeutic virtues of the stone.” An eye shadow palette and a plumping lip balm make up this collection, which pays tribute to Huda Kattan’s passion for rose quartz. We are now talking about cosmetics, and the interest in these beauty rituals does not seem to be close to

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